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Therapy with Cultured Liver Cells: Treatment Info

What can cell therapy do for your life? Knowing your option better

Administration of cultured hepatoblasts (liver cells) is a new effective method of treatment for liver diseases, such as various types of hepatitis, portal hypertension, inherited liver diseases, acute liver failure, liver based metabolic diseases and chronic liver diseases including liver cirrhosis and many other hepatic diseases.

    The values of cultured hepatoblasts in comparison with transplantation of donor hepatocytes are:
  1. It is possible to avoid the need for immunosuppression
  2. Hepatoblasts are smaller than donor hepatocytes so hepatoblasts never worsen portal hypertension or cause lung emboli.
  3. Cultured hepatoblasts in contrast to donor hepatocytes have extensive proliferative properties (i.e. they divide more often) so cultured hepatoblasts repopulate liver much easier and are more viable which give them a way to overcome inflammation and reverse fibrosis process when degenerative liver diseases are treated. Repopulation capacity of cultured hepatoblasts is also a key factor when an inherited metabolic disease is treated, because they restore missed liver function much easier than donor hepatocytes.
  4. One advantage of the cell infusions to treat acute liver failure is that they can be used early in the disease, as a potential bridge to recovery, without committing the patient to lifelong immune suppression.
  5. Cultured hepatoblasts in contrast to donor hepatocytes are readily cryopreserved and held "on call," ready to be administered at the clinical team's convenience or during emergencies;
    The advantages of infusion of cultured hepatoblasts compared with whole liver transplantation include but not limited:
  1. it is technically much easier because hepatoblasts cells are simply infused through vascular catheters;
  2. it can be repeated some time later relatively easily without any major discomfort for the patient;
  3. it is cheaper in comparison with liver transplantation;
  4. it has much lower morbidity;
    Two main groups of liver diseases are treated with hepatoblasts transplantation:
  • Acquired chronic degenerative liver diseases such as different forms of hepatitis including hepatitis B and C, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis which is a result of chronic inflammation liver damage as a consequence of any form of hepatitis;
  • Inherited (genetic) metabolic liver diseases when liver has not been damaged but can not perform some of its metabolic functions due to an inherited genetic defect.
    In each group of diseases curative role of transplanted hepatoblasts is different:
  • Degenerative liver diseases. Chronic liver diseases of liver of any origin (hepatitis B, C, fatty liver disease and others) are accompanied by scarring (liver fibrosis). Loss of organ function is often progressive despite of the use of immunosuppressive, antiviral and anti-inflammation agents. Infused hepatoblasts provide excellent antifibrotic therapy and may reverse fibrosis even at the stage of decompensated cirrhosis. The second main curative role of infused hepatoblasts is metabolic support for deteriorated liver and the body as a whole.
  • In the case of inherited metabolic liver diseases a missing gene function is provided for recipient's body by transplanted hepatoblasts. I.e. transplanted hepatoblasts produce the missing product and restore missing liver function. The aim of hepatoblast transplantation is to repopulate the liver with new healthy efficient able-bodied liver cells, injected directly into portal vein system of a patient.
    Indications for infusion of cultured hepatoblasts:
  1. Acquired liver disorders, as acute (e.g., fulminant) as well as chronic liver failure (e.g., chronic viral hepatitis, cirrhosis)
  2. Genetic disorders and genetic inherited metabolic deficiency states such as
    • Wilson's disease,
    • alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency,
    • erythropoietic protoporphyria,
    • familial amyloidosis,
    • tyrosinemia type 1,
    • congenital hyperbilirubinemia (e.g., Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Gilbert syndrome),
    • familial hypercholesterolemia,
    • glycogen storage disease type 1,
    • urea cycle defects (ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency),
    • hyperammonemia syndromes,
    • defects of carbohydrate metabolism,
    • galactosemia,
    • lysosomal storage diseases, and oxalosis
    However, there are clinical scenarios where liver cell infusion is unlikely to be performed, for example, some conditions are contraindications:
  • active sepsis where the patient's clinical status is critical;
  • metastatic malignancies;
  • cholangiocarcinoma;
  • AIDS, i.e. HIV infection;
  • psychiatric disorders;
  • active substance abuse;

 

Synonyms and related keywords: cultured liver cells, chronic liver failure, hepatic failure, liver failure, liver transplantation, liver metabolic diseases, donor liver transplantation, liver transplant, liver cell infusion, liver cell transplantation, liver dysfunction, cultured hepatoblasts, hepatoblasts, donor hepatocytes, portal hypertension, inherited metabolic disease, liver function, liver fibrosis, inherited metabolic disease, hepatoblast transplantation, chronic degenerative liver diseases, hepatitis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, chronic inflammation, fatty liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, Wilson's disease, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, erythropoietic protoporphyria, familial amyloidosis, tyrosinemia type 1, congenital hyperbilirubinemia, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Gilbert syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, glycogen storage disease type 1, urea cycle defects, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, hyperammonemia syndromes, defects of carbohydrate metabolism, galactosemia, lysosomal storage disease.

 

 

 

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